Southwest Decides Against Basic Economy and 9 Other Aviation Trends This Week

Bloomberg

Employees load bags onto a Southwest plane. Along with not offering basic economy, Southwest CEO announced the company would not start charging for the first two checked bags. Bloomberg

Skift Take: This week in aviation, Southwest goes against the norm, Asian airlines start to offer business suites, and American Airlines is missing the mark on customer service. Also, be sure to check out the new Skift research, where we look at the future in airline revenue.

— Isaac Carey

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Ex-United President Is Selected as CEO to Lead IndiGo Into a New Era

Bloomberg

India’s leading low-cost carrier, IndiGo, has plans to expand into long-haul service. It tapped Ronojoy Dutta as CEO. Bloomberg

Skift Take: IndiGo’s appointment of veteran airline CEO Ronojoy Dutta to lead its aggressive expansion, particularly into new long-haul territory, is a fresh departure from the woes of non-happening Air India or Jet Airways.

— Raini Hamdi

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Merely the Normal Airport Hassles Should Be Back Soon Post-Shutdown

Kathleen Foody  / Associated Press

Airline passengers enter the main security checkpoint at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta on May 30, 2016. Travelers who had braced for long lines and long waits were instead moving through most U.S. airports fairly quickly Monday, as the busy Memorial Day travel weekend drew to a close. TSA workers are now returning to work after the U.S. government shutdown. Kathleen Foody / Associated Press

Skift Take: TSA workers, who called out sick because they couldn’t afford to commute to work or had to moonlight to pay for groceries, rent or mortgages because of the U.S. government shutdown, should get back to work, and feel a lot happier about it, this weekend or early next week.

— Dennis Schaal

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Brits on Holiday Face 3-Hour Entry Delays If No-Deal Brexit Occurs

Manu Fernandez  / Associated Press

Could this be what the airport in Barcelona looks like in the event of a no-deal Brexit? Passengers wait to pass the security control at the Barcelona airport in Prat Llobregat, Spain, August 4, 2017. Manu Fernandez / Associated Press

Skift Take: Many Brits love their summer holidays in Europe, but they may have to brandish passports that are valid for at least another six months, and face other bureaucratic delays before unloading their bags at the hotel. Was the pro-Brexit crowd taking this into account when they voted in favor of the referendum?

— Dennis Schaal

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